This course gives the beginning filmmaker a fundamental understanding of the digital filmmaking process, starting from preproduction and going through production to post- production and delivery. Through lectures, screenings and hands-on practical learning, the students will learn the jobs and responsibilities of the each member of a film crew, proper on- set procedures and protocols, and understand the fundamentals of screenwriting, casting, working with actors, camera techniques, directing and editing. Over the course of the class, each student will take a film project from inception to completion by applying the techniques learned throughout the course. This course will combine practical with theoretical learning in helping students gain a solid foundation in digital filmmaking.

An examination of selected films of Akira Kurosawa from the point of view of their origins in global culture and their impact on international film culture, in turn. The course will focus on those films that clearly interact with world culture(s) and which have been overtly or in some sense remade, concentrating on theoretical issues of transnational culture, intertextuality and reception.  Viewing of films, critical and source readings, and response and research papers are required.


Through mini lectures, readings, discussions and production workshops and labs, this course explores the horror genre in a transnational context. The course combines theoretical and experiential learning to help broaden students’ theoretical and historical knowledge and deepen their artistic practices.


This course is designed to build upon the skills and tools that the student filmmaker acquired in their Introduction to Digital Filmmaking course and give them a more advanced understanding of the digital filmmaking process.  Through lectures, screenings and practical work, student filmmakers will gain a comprehensive understanding and experience in all phases of digital filmmaking: development, preproduction, production and post-production.  Students will take the concepts discussed in class to plan, develop, shoot and edit a final narrative project.

This course gives the beginning filmmaker hands-on experience practicing the fundamentals of post production editing and sound design. Through lectures, reading, and a series of shooting and editing exercises, you learn how to shape your story and guide your audience’s emotional and intellectual experience of your film.

Students must already have already installed editing software on their computer (Premiere, FinalCut Pro, Avid, or other) and understand basic editing moves such as cutting clips, creating sequences, and outputting.

Throughout the semester, students shoot and edit three short 30- to 60-second exercises. The final project is prepping, shooting, editing, and scoring a 2 to 5-minute narrative short.

This course will combine practical with theoretical learning in helping students gain a solid foundation in postproduction editing and sound design.


This course focuses on central issues and concerns relating to the effective management of teaching and learning processes in second and foreign language classrooms. In this course management does not mean the creation of budgets and the creation of timelines, but the creation of a positive pedagogical environment which facilitates learning.

The focus of the course is on the professional decisions that teachers must make in order to ensure that learning takes place effectively. Content will include lesson planning; teacher talk, including the effective use of questions, the provision of explanations and the use of feedback; classroom dynamics; instructional groups, small group work, dealing with large classes, one-to-one teaching, and learner-teacher roles; affective issues in the language classroom; and classroom monitoring and evaluation.

As digital media replace the photo-chemical basis of the filmic text and the cinematic experience, we should take the opportunity to return to the originary moment of the movies and rethink the issue of “aesthetics.” This course will thus consider “film-form-degree-zero,” re-examining theories of early cinema and the basics of filmic construction, including the shot, framing, the moving camera and editing.  We will then consider more sophisticated films from the standpoint of the creation of on-screen and off-screen space and complex narrative strategies.  Finally, we will take a moment in the stream of mid-century cinema, at the height of Hollywood’s so-called “Classical” era, and see how what has come to be taken as a standardized film language was, in fact, roiling with experimentation.

This course focuses on central issues and concerns relating to the effective management of teaching and learning processes in second and foreign language classrooms. In this course management does not mean the creation of budgets and the creation of timelines, but the creation of a positive pedagogical environment which facilitates learning.

The focus of the course is on the professional decisions that teachers must make in order to ensure that learning takes place effectively. Content will include lesson planning; teacher talk, including the effective use of questions, the provision of explanations and the use of feedback; classroom dynamics; instructional groups, small group work, dealing with large classes, one-to-one teaching, and learner-teacher roles; affective issues in the language classroom; and classroom monitoring and evaluation.

What is film? What is its relationship with language and with reality? What is the balance of power between film form, ‘author’, culture and spectator? This intensive course provides an historical overview of the evolving body of major theories that have explored these questions.  It examines the theoretical movements that have attempted to make sense of the aesthetic, cultural, and psychoanalytical dimensions of film.  Topics considered include: formalism, realism, the auteur, semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminist frameworks, genre analysis, spectatorship, cultural studies, the transnational, and digital and post-cinema debate.

This course gives the beginning filmmaker a fundamental understanding of the digital filmmaking process, starting from preproduction and going through production to post- production and delivery. Through lectures, screenings and hands-on practical learning, the students will learn the jobs and responsibilities of the each member of a film crew, proper on- set procedures and protocols, and understand the fundamentals of screenwriting, casting, working with actors, camera techniques, directing and editing. Over the course of the class, each student will take a film project from inception to completion by applying the techniques learned throughout the course. This course will combine practical with theoretical learning in helping students gain a solid foundation in digital filmmaking.